Hey everybody,

Reebok's new campaign, "Always Classic", is combining a diverse selection of contemporary influencers (Gigi Hadid, Ariana Grande, Lil Yachty, Rae Sremmurd, graffiti artists Felipe Pantone and Sany, K-pop artist Somi and others) with 90s hip hop aesthetics.

"While the four shoes themselves have their roots in the 1980s, the new campaign draws heavily on positioning developed in the 2000s, says Todd Krinsky, general manager of Reebok Classics. “It’s allowed us to be topical in pop culture, whether it’s working with big celebrities like Gigi Hadid, right down to small street artists.” And it also draws on ’90s nostalgia, “right down to colors and ’90s hip-hop. Even if young people didn’t grow up on it, they’re inspired by that innovation and gravitating toward those silhouettes.” [Sarah Mahoney, 2018] Via MediaPost

So far,  so good. We occasionally like to refer to millennials as generation hip hop. We do this for the same reason that Reebok is now falling back on 90s hip hop aesthetics to market their products: "even if young people didn’t grow up on it, they’re inspired by that innovation and gravitating toward those silhouettes" [Todd Krinsky, GM of Reebok Classics].

Of course, style cues aren't enough. Authenticity, aspiration and a sense for perpetual cool lie at the heart of the millennial mindset and are therefore the foundation on which a business must build. Reebok seems to understand this:

"He [Todd Krinsky] says that while retro styles, in general, are a major trend now, this kind of mash-up has broad appeal to the nonconformists in its Millennial audience, who are looking for style cues that are both disruptive and authentic. “That’s what ‘Always Classic’ means to them. They appreciate it and respect a brand’s heritage, but they want to shake it up." [Sarah Mahoney, 2018] Via MediaPost

Reebok got the keys.

One Love,

Marius | 1520

 

 

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